Feb 28, 2020  
2019-2020 College of Liberal Arts 
    
2019-2020 College of Liberal Arts

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    FILM 255 - Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema

    4 credits
    A chronological survey of developments in Russian film history from the pre-revolutionary era to the present. Students will be exposed to a wide range of movies, including early silent films (pre- and post-revolutionary), experimental films of the 1920s and early 1930s, socialist realist films, films on World War II and Soviet life, and films from the glasnost’ era and contemporary Russia. Readings will include theoretical articles and selections from Russian film history and criticism. All readings are in English and all films shown with English subtitles. Offered alternate spring semesters. CLA-Breadth/Arts, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    FILM 256 - German Film in English

    4 credits
    An examination of a theme or period in German cinema. Topics vary but include Film of the Weimar Era, World War II through the Lens of Film, and new German Cinema. Readings and discussions in English. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined. CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary
  
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    FILM 302 - Contemporary Italian Cinema

    4 credits
    Viewing of contemporary Italian films with lectures and discussions on topics such as society, media, life styles, family, and politics. Oral presentations and short papers. Conducted in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 201 . Offered in alternate years. CLA-Breadth/Arts, CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FILM 304 - Contemporary Francophone Cinema

    4 credits
    Through weekly screenings of recent films (released in the last decade or so), this course introduces students to current social, cultural and narrative concerns in Francophone cinema. Intensive conversational and writing practice, along with regular language review and creative assignments provide students with numerous opportunities to acquire basic vocabulary and analytical tools that are specific to the study of audiovisual documents in French. May be taken concurrently with FREN 302 or FREN 306. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 201 , FREN 281 or equivalent. Offered spring semester. CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FILM 308 - From Book to Screen

    4 credits


    The course focuses on the reading of selected Italian literary masterpeices and on viewing their subsequent “translation” on to thescreen by Italian directors. It also serves as an introduction to the major literary movements throught he works of prominent writers.Film and selected scene analysis, writing activities (with systematic editing), class discussions and presentations, grammar reviews will improve students’ linguistic skills.

     

     

      Prerequisite: ITAL 201  or equivalent. Offered in alternate years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Writing Intensive, CLA-Writing in the Major

  
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    FILM 322 - Thinking about Genre through Film

    4 credits
    What is a genre?  How do assumptions shaped by genre inform our  interpretation of literary and film texts and structure our experiences of those narratives?  This course will explore these questions through reading film and genre theory and through viewing classic and contemporary films in such genres as film noir, melodrama, romance, and the western.   Prerequisite: ENGH 150   Equivalent Courses:  ENGH 322  
  
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    FILM 323 - Cinema and Social Justice

    4 credits
    What is the role of cinema in social justice struggles? How does political climate affect cinematic culture and vice versa? What is the significance of independent media, and how do we understand the relationship between media and democracy? This class will address some of these questions by closely analyzing and contextualizing films by Errol Morris, Michael Moore, Vittorio de Sica, Ken Loach, and others. Drawing on film and media theory, students will examine films’ political claims and assess their social implications. One of the eventual goals will be to imagine what a revolutionary cinema might look like in the era of the Internet. Prerequisite: ENGH 150  or ENGH 120   or FILM 101   Equivalent Courses:ENGL 238  / ENGH 323   CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FILM 324 - Filming American Feminisms

    4 credits
    Through examination of documentary and fiction films, this course will explore the development of thinking about women, gender, and feminism after 1900. The course will think simultaneously about the evolution of feminist thought in the twentieth century and about how film has engaged with, represented, supported, disseminated, and critiqued those developing ideas.  Readings in feminist theory of the period will be put in dialogue with a wide range of films from silents to Hollywood blockbusters to independents and documentaries made with explicitly feminist purposes. Prerequisite: ENGH 150  or WGST 101   Equivalent Course: WGST 301  / ENGH 324   CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary, CLA-Diversity US, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    FILM 325 - Gender and Film

    4 credits
    In what ways has film inspired theories about the social construction of femininity and masculinity? In turn, how has aesthetic and social theory analyzed gendered bodies, subjectivities and relations within film? How, moreover, do structures of social inequality affect film production and distribution? This class will introduce you to film as well as film theory revolving around gender and its intersections with race, class, and sexuality. Primary texts will include a variety of international films by twentieth-century and contemporary directors like Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Jane Campion, Todd Haynes, Celine Sciamma, Laura Poitras, and others. In conjunction with these primary texts, you will read a range of film theory— from feminist and psychoanalytical to political-economic and formalist approaches. By the end of class, you should ideally be able to closely analyze film and thereby engage in debates about the relationship between aesthetics and social justice. This class counts towards the Film and Media Studies minor. Equivalent Courses: ENGL 303  / ENGH 325   CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary, CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Diversity US, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    FILM 337 - Electronic Music Composition

    4 credits


    Focus is on original composition using electronic sound systems developed over the past half century. Procedures examined include both analog and digital synthesis techniques ranging from a classic Moog Synthesizer to FM and wave table synthesis, MIDI (Music Instruments Digital Interface), sequencing, sampling, and algorithmic control. Goals include creation and presentation of several short works together with a final substantial composition.   May be repeated for credit two (2) times with instructor approval.

      Enrollment priority: Enrollment priority: music majors and minors. Prerequisite: MUS 101  or permission of the instructor. Signature of instructor required for registration. Equivalent Courses: MUS 337   Offered spring semester.

  
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    FILM 345 - Cinematic Language: An Introduction to Spanish Filmic Discourse

    4 credits
    An advanced study of Spanish cinema and its cinematographic expression through a systematic analysis of the filmic processes. Based on four basic issues in Spanish films: hybridization; violence; sexual allure; and regional cinemas (Catalan and Basque), students will explore how language mechanisms - ellipsis, transitions, metaphors, symbols, dialogues, narrative processes, time and space are utilized by filmmakers to create unique discursive texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 310  or special permission. CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FILM 350 - Selected Topics in Modern Chinese Literature and Film

    4 credits
    Chinese literature, cinema, and drama of the twentieth century, a time when China faced western challenges to its national identity and cultural tradition. Texts of the twentieth century are distinctively modern, covering such issues as westernization and tradition, revolution, family restructuring and women’s role in society. Course may be repeated. Equivalent Courses: CHIN 350   Offered fall semester. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FILM 354 - Gender in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction and Film

    4 credits
    This course provides a broad understanding of how gender and sexuality are articulated in fiction, film and other images in the Spanish-speaking world today. We approach these texts using multidisciplinary approaches, and examine their intersection with race, class and Hispanic cultural values and traditions. It will be organized thematically and by region to better understand the diversity of the Hispanic world. Using recent theoretical approaches (feminist, post-feminist, queer), we will study various gender representations (male, female, performative) as we elaborate on issues of authorship, representation and reception. Same as WGST 354   Taught in English. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    FILM 362 - Fantasy and Reality in French Cinema (1895-present)

    4 credits
    This course surveys major aesthetic trends and technological events in the history of French cinema, including examples of early actualités, poetic realism, 1960s cinéma vérité and more recently heritage cinema and « cinéma de banlieue ». In addition to weekly screenings, students are introduced to the critical discourse that has informed the field of film studies since the mid-twentieth century. Reading assignments will include texts by André Bazin, François Truffaut, Jean-Louis Comolli and more recently Jacques Rancière. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 304  or FREN 310 . Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 101 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written French I

    4 credits
    An introduction to the French spoken and written language. Covers the basics of the French language through videos, readings, and realia from Francophone cultures. Interactive practice in the classroom and use of multimedia lab, oral, written, and computer-assisted activities. Offered fall semester.
  
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    FREN 102 - Fundamentals of Oral and Written French II

    4 credits
    French 102 is a continuation of FREN 101  or the equivalent level. Designed for students who have already covered the basics of the French language, but have not yet been exposed to all tenses and other grammar fundamentals. Videos, culture readings, interactive practice in the classroom, oral written and computer-assisted activities. Prerequisite: FREN 101  or FREN 181 . Offered every semester.
  
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    FREN 181 - Fundamentals of Oral French I in Paris

    4 credits


     

    Designed for students who have already covered the basics of the French language, but have not yet been exposed to all tenses and other grammar fundamentals. Videos, cultural readings, interactive practice in the classroom.  

     

    Prerequisite: FREN 101   Offered in Paris. Summer only.

  
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    FREN 182 - Fundamentals of Oral French II in Paris

    4 credits
    Designed for students who have already covered the basics of the French language, but have not yet been exposed to all tenses and other grammar fundamentals. Videos, cultural readings, interactive practice in the classroom.
      Offered in Paris. Prerequisite: FREN 101  or  
  
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    FREN 183 - Beginning Intensive Conversation in Paris

    4 credits
    Provides intensive practice in oral communication and emphasizes development of oral competence in everyday situations.



     Prerequisite: FREN 101  Offered in Paris. Summer only. Taught in French.
  
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    FREN 199 - ShortTREC Program at the Introductory Level

    1-8 credits
    The course will focus on selected topics offered as shortTRECs through the Center for Global Education.  Topics and location of the course will vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise.  May be repeated as topic changes.  Offering to be determined. CLA-Off Campus Experience
  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French

    4 credits
    A continuation of FREN 102 . Review of basic grammar; development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through films, discussion, Francophone articles and literary texts, compositions, and computer-assisted activities. A prerequisite for FREN 302  and FREN 304 . Prerequisite: FREN 102  or  . Offered every semester. CLA-Foreign Language
  
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    FREN 233 - Is Another World Possible? Globalization in the Francophone World (in English)

    4 credits
    This interdisciplinary course draws from fiction and documentary films, critical essays, literary texts, manifestoes, as well as various forms of documentations of local and international street protests. It seeks to account for, and question, the specificities of anti-globalization reactions expressed in the Francophone world, particularly France, Quebec and West African countries. The current focus on “globalization” as an economic moment will thus be examined in relation to broader historical and intellectual debates. No Prerequisite. Taught in English. Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FREN 235 - Women’s Voices through the Ages (in English)

    4 credits
    A critical reading of novels written in French by women from the late 17th through the 20th centuries. The study of 20th-century authors also includes women writers from the Francophone world (Quebec, Africa, and the Caribbean). Course may be repeated. Offered in 2008-2009. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FREN 261 - Selected Topics in French and Francophone Literature

    2-4 credits
    A study of a topic or topics in a linguistic, cultural, or literary aspect of the French-speaking world not covered by the current offerings of the French Department. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: FREN 201  or FREN 281 . Offering to be determined. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 280 - DIS On-site Seminar: French Culture

    4 credits
  
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    FREN 281 - Intermediate French in Paris

    4 credits
     Review of basic grammar; development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through films, discussion, Francophone articles and literary texts, compositions, multimedia lab and computer-assisted activities. Offered in Paris. Prerequisite: FREN 102  or FREN 182 . Summer only. CLA-Foreign Language
  
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    FREN 283 - Intermediate Intensive Conversation in France

    4 credits


    Provides intensive practice in oral communication and emphasizes development of oral competence in everyday situations and current contemporary topics in France.


     

       Prerequisite: FREN 102  or FREN 182  or instructor’s signature. Offered in Paris. Summer only. Taught in French.

  
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    FREN 299 - ShortTREC Program at the Intermediate Level

    1-8 credits
    The course will focus on selected topics offered as shortTRECs through the Center for Global Education.  Topics and location of the course will vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise.  May be repeated as topic changes.  Offering to be determined. CLA-Off Campus Experience
  
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    FREN 300 - Independent Study: French

    2-4 credits
    A tutorial course. Students investigate a chosen topic in French or Francophone literature or language and culture under the guidance of French department faculty. Oral and written reports. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Meets: weekly. Open only to students with junior or senior standing. Prerequisite: 12 credits of advanced work in French with a B average. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
  
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    FREN 302 - Contemporary French Society and Cross-Cultural Perspectives

    4 credits


    A conversation and composition class on current events and contemporary themes in France and the Francophone world. The course seeks to enhance oral fluency through class discussions, debates, oral presentations on recent topics in the French media. Written practice through media analysis, press reviews, and short papers.

    With a community-based-learning component, students, paired with a student from a local educational institution, are also able to exchange their views, from their own cultural perspectives, on different contemporary themes (media, immigration, family, education, etc.) covered in class. Exposed to larger linguistic and cultural issues from our global world, students are able to develop an intercultural communicative competency in a cross-cultural community-based-learning context while growing a greater awareness and deeper appreciation of linguistic and cultural diversity. Prerequisite: FREN 201 FREN 281  or equivalent. Offered Fall semester. CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Writing Intensive, CLA-Civic Engagement

  
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    FREN 304 - Contemporary Francophone Cinema

    4 credits
    Through weekly screenings of recent films (released in the last decade or so), this course introduces students to current social, cultural and narrative concerns in Francophone cinema. Intensive conversational and writing practice, along with regular language review and creative assignments provide students with numerous opportunities to acquire basic vocabulary and analytical tools that are specific to the study of audiovisual documents in French. May be taken concurrently with FREN 302 or FREN 306. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 201 , FREN 281 or equivalent. Offered spring semester. CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 306 - From Word to Text

    4 credits
    An advanced intermediate course in the use of French, both written and spoken. Stresses written composition, stylistic analysis, and conversational fluency. Systematic grammar review, basic textual analysis, editing and some translation from English to French sharpen students’ linguistic skills. Class discussions and writing on various topics that expose students further to French and Francophone cultures. May be taken concurrently with any course at the 300 level. Prerequisite: FREN 302  or FREN 304 . Offering to be determined. CLA-Writing Intensive, CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 310 - Introduction to Literature and Culture

    4 credits
    A gateway course developing reading fluency and oral practice through a study of selected themes drawn from plays, poetry and fiction in the French literary traditions. This course is required for French majors and for more advanced electives. Offered ONLY each Fall. Prerequisites:  ,   or  . CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Writing in the Major
  
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    FREN 334 - International Business French

    4 credits
    France is the second largest economy in the European Union which is the most important trading block of the United States. Given this context and the use of French in various other business situations in Francophone countries, this course aims at enhancing French oral and written skills related to the world of business, economics and finance. A cross-cultural training prepares students for a week-long mid-semester trip to Québec where they practice their French and meet with representatives of the French-speaking Canadian business community. (Extra-costs borne by the students are room and board at off-campus site). Assignments include oral presentations of articles and short response papers on topics discussed in class. Final projects include the simulation of a French job interview and case studies of social entrepreneurship in French-speaking Africa. Prerequisite FREN 310 [old FREN 104a/b] or Instructor’s Signature. CLA-Off Campus Experience
  
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    FREN 336 - Protest in the North African Tradition: From Colonization to the Arab Spring

    4 credits
    This course focuses on the tradition of rebellion in French-speaking areas of North Africa, resulting in a literary tradition in which protest, primarily against an outside, but later against an internal presence, develops as an important mode of political expression. The role of women in Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan societies is an aspect of the challenge to existing social practices. Documents are explored from different modes and fields, including historical, sociological, and literary sources. Crosslisted with MEST. Offered triennially. Prerequisite: FREN 310  or the equivalent. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International, CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary
  
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    FREN 338 - The Caribbean Triangle

    4 credits
    The sources of the French Caribbean cultural traditions are examined through print, electronic, and other media sources.  The cultural traditions include those of Haiti, Guadeloupe, and Martinique International Relations, both historial and contemporary, will be examined between mainland France, West Africa, and the Caribbean, along with more recent developments between paris, the French Caribbean, and North America.  Topics treated include social protest, definition of personal and collective identity, language and identity, economic relations with mainland France and also with other Caribbean islands.  Besides contemporary literary and documentary texts, the music, painting, fashion, and food of the islands will be studied, followed by an off-campus Caribbean dinner.  Conducted in French. Prerequisite: One upper-level French course. Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FREN 339 - Paris, Dakar, and Port-au-Prince (in English)

    4 credits
    A course examining the international ties between France, West Africa, and the Caribbean, as well as a further tie with North America. It includes materials from film, narrative, poetic, and documentary sources. Themes treat bicultural encounters, revolt and rebellion, as well as the formation of new cultural traditions. Conducted in English. No prerequisites. Crosslisted with PANAF. Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    FREN 340 - France in the 21st Century

    4 credits
    A study of representative texts showing cultural, social, economic, and political developments in France since 2000. Trends such as the impact of internationalism and the new Europe, as well as the challenging of social norms will be examined in twenty first century fiction. Prerequisite: FREN 310  . CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 346 - Worlds of Wonder and Terror: Children’s Literature

    4 credits
    This course provides a broad introduction to the rich traditions of texts written for children in French. Materials covered in class include picture books, fables, folklore, fantasy and realistic fiction from the classics to the most innovative texts. How do these texts represent the world of adults and the world of children? What cultural norms and values do they seek to reflect, promote or challenge? In particular, how do attitudes towards gender, class and race shift through the ages and across Francophone cultures? Oral and written assignments enchance student’s creativity and sharpen analytical skills. Prerequisite: FREN 310. Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 348 - The French Enlightenment: Culture and Society

    4 credits
    The 18th century in France was a period of major political, cultural, and ideological transformations, culminating in the French Revolution. The course examines how the printed word itself becomes a major weapon in the hands of the philosophers, women, and others to challenge the legitimacy of the established political and ideological order of the ancient régime. Written assignments include the publication of students’ contributions to the Encyclopedia of Diderot & D’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/. Prerequisite: FREN 310 (old FREN 104a/b). Offered triennially. Fulfills: BH Prerequisite: FREN+104. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 350 - Reading and Writing French Poetry

    4 credits
    An examination of the nature of poetic creativity through numerous examples from 20th-century French and Francophone poets, such as Apollinaire, Breton, Eluard, Chedid, Desnos, Michaux, Reverdy, Senghor, Césaire. Students are encouraged to write their own poetry, which is published in the Drew French literary journal. Prerequisite: FREN 310 . CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Breadth/Arts
  
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    FREN 352 - Poetry and Culture

    4 credits
    An examination of the changing relations between poetry and political, sexual, cultural, and social identities in the works of recent French and Francophone poets. Students are encouraged to write their own poetry, which is then published in Drew’s French literary journal. Prerequisite: FREN 310  . CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Breadth/Arts
  
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    FREN 354 - From World War II to 9/11: The Contemporary Novel

    4 credits
    The course examines the impact of international events and cultural movements on French novels and short stories from World War II to 9/11/2001. We discuss international events such as the Holocaust and its after-effects, decolonization and the immigration of peoples from former French colonies to mainland France, as well as the impact of changes in the relation between France and other countries in Europe and with other regions of the world following the break-up of the Soviet bloc. Offered triennially. Prerequisite: FREN 310 . CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 362 - Fantasy and Reality in French Cinema (1895-present)

    4 credits
    This course surveys major aesthetic trends and technological events in the history of French cinema, including examples of early actualités, poetic realism, 1960s cinéma vérité and more recently heritage cinema and « cinéma de banlieue ». In addition to weekly screenings, students are introduced to the critical discourse that has informed the field of film studies since the mid-twentieth century. Reading assignments will include texts by André Bazin, François Truffaut, Jean-Louis Comolli and more recently Jacques Rancière. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 304  or FREN 310 . Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 364 - Staging the Self and the Other

    4 credits
    This course examines works representative of the dramatic tradition spanning from the French classical stage to contemporary works written by authors of French expression. The construction of personal or social or national identity is central to our study and our exploration of the complex dynamic that exists between the spaces of performance, reception, and imagination. Some written assignments but emphasis put on oral expression, diction, articulation. Students perform parts of a play as part of their oral exam.  Offered triennially. Prerequisite: FREN 310 . Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 366 - Entertaining Crowds: Popular Culture in 19th and 20th Century France

    4 credits
    This course examines the social, economic and cultural contexts that facilitated the emergence of popular forms of cuture throughout the 19th century and the increased influence of mass media on cultural production throughout the 20th century. Course materials will focus primarily on visual forms of expressions, including photography, visual panoramas, paintings, and cinema. Connections will be made with print and musical cultural productions, such as serial publications, crime and pulp fiction, songs and musical performances, in an effort to define the narrative and performing principles of these cultural productions as well as ways in which they have been consumed, gradually institutionalized and redefined over the course of the last two centuries. Selected reading assignments will help students frame critically the notions of “popular” and “culture”. Conducted in French. FREN 310  Offered triennially. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 368 - Selected Topics in French and Francophone Literatures (in French)

    2-4 credits
    A study of a topic or topics in a linguistic, cultural, or literary aspect of the French-speaking world not covered by the current offerings of the French Department.  May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: One course at the 300-level or Instructor’s permission. Offering: To be determined. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    FREN 380 - DIS On-site Seminar: French Culture

    4 credits
  
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    FREN 381 - Advanced Conversation in Paris: Contemporary Topics

    4 credits


    Grammar and vocabulary review at the advanced level. Development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through written assignments and class discussions. Prerequisite: FREN 201  or above.

      Offered in Paris. Summer only.

     

     

  
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    FREN 382 - Advanced Topics in Paris

    4 credits
  
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    FREN 383 - Advanced Intensive Conversation in Paris

    4 credits


     Provides intensive practice in oral communication and emphasizes development of oral competence in everyday situations and current contemporary topics in France.


       Prerequisite: FREN 102  or instructor’s signature. Offered in Paris. Summer only. Taught in French

  
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    FREN 399 - ShortTrec Program at the Upper Level

    1-8 credits
    The course will focus on selected topics offered as shortTRECs through the Center for Global Education.  Topics and location of the course will vary in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise.  May be repeated as topic changes.  Offering to be determined. CLA-Off Campus Experience
  
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    FREN 400 - Capstone Seminar

    2 credits
    The theme of “Revolt, Rebellion and Revolution” lies at the basis of most literary and cultural movements in modern France, modern being defined in a historical sense as events following the French Revolution in 1789. This capstone course designated for senior French majors is to explore how various texts of French expression represent and/or impact the radical literary and cultural shifts that have occurred from the French Enlightenment to today. While the analysis of primary and secondary literary sources deepens students’ knowledge of French literature, other texts (films and archival material) broaden and contextualize their understanding of French society. Students exchange ideas and discuss all texts in class conversations and in senior project. CLA-Capstone
  
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    FREN 410 - Specialized Honors I


    CLA-Capstone
  
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    FREN 411 - Specialized Honors II

    0-8 credits

      CLA-Capstone
  
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    GERM 101 - Elementary German I

    4 credits
    An introduction to German emphasizing communicative skills. Areas such as society, geography, and traditions form the content base. Open to students who have little or no experience in German or who have been assigned to the course after placement examination. Offered fall semester. Offered fall semester.
  
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    GERM 102 - Elementary German II

    4 credits
    An introduction to German emphasizing communicative skills. Areas such as society, geography, and traditions form a content base. Open to students who have little or no experience in German or who have been assigned to the course after placement examination. Prerequisite: GERM 101 . Recommended: Concurrent registration in GERM+6. Offered spring semester.
  
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    GERM 201 - Intermediate German

    4 credits
    A continuation of the development of German language skills, with an emphasis on vocabulary, structures, reading, and oral and written communication. Exploration of the societies and traditions of the German-speaking countries. Open to students who have completed one year of college German or who have been assigned to the course after placement examination. Recommended: Concurrent registration in GERM+17. Offered fall semester. CLA-Foreign Language
  
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    GERM 202 - German Culture and Conversation

    4 credits
    A conversation course that concentrates on popular culture in German-speaking countries. Discussions, presentations, and short papers involved. Prerequisite: GERM 201  or permission of instructor. Recommended: concurrent registration in GERM+18. Offered spring semester. CLA-Writing Intensive, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    GERM 250 - German Studies in English

    4 credits
    The study of German culture as it relates to disciplines such as history, political science, philosophy, music, art history, and media studies. Topics vary. Readings and discussions in English. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 252 - German Literature in English

    4 credits
    A study of a topic related to German literature. Topics vary but include The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, The Faust Tradition, Humor in German Literature, and German-Jewish Literature and Culture. Readings and discussions in English. Course may be repeated. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 254 - German Culture in English

    4 credits
    The study of a specific topic in German culture. Topics vary. Readings and discussions in English. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 256 - German Film in English

    4 credits
    An examination of a theme or period in German cinema. Topics vary but include Film of the Weimar Era, World War II through the Lens of Film, and new German Cinema. Readings and discussions in English. Course may be repeated. Offering to be determined. CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary
  
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    GERM 300 - Independent Study in German

    1-4 credits
    A program of study designed to enable students to study areas not offered in other courses. At least one weekly meeting; readings, oral and written reports, and papers. Conducted in German. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered every semester.
  
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    GERM 301 - Introduction to German Studies

    4 credits
    This course is an introduction to the debates and methodologies in the field of German Studies, and it explores various media and genres, including literature, film, music, and the visual arts. Development of analytical writing and argumentation in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 202  or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 310 - German Literature and Culture

    4 credits
    This course examines a topic in further depth and develops analytical writing and argumentation in German. Further development of analytical writing and argumentation in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 301  or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester. CLA-Writing in the Major
  
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    GERM 320 - Periods in German Literature

    4 credits
    The study of the literature from a particular period. Topics vary but include Goethe and the Classic Age, German Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-War German Literature. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 310  or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 330 - Themes in German Literature

    4 credits
    The study of a theme in literature. Topics vary but include The Cities of Vienna and Berlin in Literature, Humor in German Literature, and German-Jewish Literature and Culture. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 310  or permission of instructor. to be determined.
  
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    GERM 340 - German Film

    4 credits
    The study of German film tradition. Topics vary. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 310  or permission of instructor. to be determined.
  
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    GERM 350 - German Studies

    4 credits
    The study of German culture as it relates to disciplines such as history, political science, philosophy, music, art history, and media studies. Topics vary. Class presentations, discussions, and short papers in German. Course may be repeated. Prerequisite: GERM 310  or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GERM 400 - Capstone Project

    2 credits
    Open only to senior German majors. Registration during the senior year by arrangement with the department. Participation in a seminar, which forms the basis for a 15-20 page paper, written in German and developed in consultation with the instructor. Signature of instructor required for registration. Offered annually. CLA-Capstone
  
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    GERM 410 - Specialized Honors I

    0-8 credits
  
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    GERM 411 - Specialized Honors II

    0-8 credits
  
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    GRK 101 - Elementary Greek I

    4 credits
    An introduction to classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected passages from ancient Greek authors read throughout the course, allowing students to gain a familiarity not only with the language itself but also with important aspects of Greek culture and civilization. Offering to be determined.
  
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    GRK 102 - Elementary Greek II

    4 credits
    An introduction to classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected passages from ancient Greek authors read throughout the course, allowing students to gain a familiarity not only with the language itself but also with important aspects of Greek culture and civilization. Prerequisite: GRK 101 . Offering to be determined.
  
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    GRK 201 - Intermediate Greek: Prose

    4 credits
    Readings from Greek prose works, such as the Histories of Herodotus and Plato’s Apology of Socrates, together with a review of grammar and an introduction to Greek thought. Prerequisite: One year of college Greek or equivalent. Offering to be determined. CLA-Foreign Language
  
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    GRK 299 - Greek Across the Curriculum

    1-2 credits
    Foreign Languages across the Curriculum is a tutorial program which seeks to enable students with at least intermediate-level proficiency in a foreign language to access authentic materials in that language that are relevant to a cognate course. Students will use their acquired skills to read and interpret texts in the foreign language and/or conduct research in the language. Knowledge gained will be applied to the work of the cognate course. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Signature of instructor required.
  
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    GRK 300 - Readings in Greek Authors

    2-4 credits
    Extensive readings in a Greek author or authors selected to satisfy students’ special areas of interest or need (e.g., selections may come from Greek epic, tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, history, philosophy, or biography). May be taken as an independent study. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: GRK 201  or permission of instructor. Offered every fall and spring semester.
  
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    GRK 301 - Homer

    4 credits
    Readings from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, with a study of their literary and historical significance. Prerequisite: GRK 201  or permission of instructor. Offering to be determined.
  
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    HIST 101 - History of the United States, From Contact to 1877

    4 credits
    A study of the development of the United States from first contact between Europeans and Native peoples through the Civil war and reconstruction. Covers such issues as the rationale for contact and conquest, the nature of colonial development, the American revolution, the transformation of the republic into a democracy, expansion to the Pacific, industrialization, the development and implications of slavery, and national collapse and reunion. Offered fall semester. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity US
  
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    HIST 102 - History of the United States, 1876-Present

    4 credits
    A survey of the development of American society from Reconstruction to the present. Treats major events, such as the Great Depression, and explores significant themes, such as industrialization and world power. Offered spring semester. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity US
  
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    HIST 104 - European History 1492-1789: Reformation, Enlightenment, and Revolution

    4 credits
    A survey of European history from Columbus to Napoleon. Emphasizes broad themes, such as European exploration, the rise of absolute monarchy, the triumph of parliamentary government in England, the culture of the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Offered fall semester. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 105 - European History 1789-1989: Nationalism, Totalitarianism, and Rebirth

    4 credits
    A survey of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the collapse of Communism. Emphasizes such topics as German and Italian unification, imperialism, the phenomenon of total war, the Bolshevik revolution, Fascism, the Cold War and European revival after 1945, and the collapse of Communism. Offered spring semester. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    HIST 107 - Contemporary Issues in World History

    4 credits
    An introduction to historical thinking via contemporary issues. Each semester a set of issues is selected for investigation in detail. Issues might include ecological problems, racism, modernization, democracy, fundamentalism, totalitarianism, feminism, revolution, the welfare state, sexuality, and multiculturalism. Offering to be determined. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 201 - Selected Topics in History

    2-4 credits
    A study of a historical theme or topic at the intermediate level that uses a methodological approach or viewpoint not fully explored within departmental offerings. Topics vary. Amount of credit established at time of registration. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. To be determined. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 202 - Molecules and Making America

    4 credits
    Chemistry in U.S. History is an interdisciplinary team-taught U.S. history survey that examines significant chemical processes in the context of contemporaneous social, economic, and political developments. For example, for the colonial period students will explore how potash (KOH) production and New England’s role as the world’s leading rum (C2H5OH + R-COOH + esters) manufacturer were linked to frontier settlement, the early Atlantic economy, and slave-based agriculture. A partial listing of other periods and processes covered includes the Revolutionary era and gunpowder manufacturing; the mid-1800s and early photographic chemistry; the invention of celluloid, synthetic ammonia, vulcanized rubber, and metallurgical processes in the late 1800s; petroleum distillation, synthetic compounds including long-chain polymers, and pharmaceutical chemistry in the 1900s.  All of these processes, and more besides, were instrumental in shaping the U.S. economy, society, environment, and culture. The course is designed to be accessible to humanities and science students alike.  Prerequisites are either CHEM 150  or CHEM 151 , or HIST 101  or HIST 102  or a score of 4 or 5 on the respective AP exams. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary, CLA-Breadth/Natural Science.
  
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    HIST 210 - Historical Research Methods

    4 credits
    Introduction to the research methods historians use to gather information and interpret historical processes. Practical experience in exploring a variety of primary sources including oral history and historical archives. Introduction to historical reading and reasoning. Offered annually. CLA-Writing in the Major
  
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    HIST 211 - African-American History: African Origins to 1877

    4 credits
    An examination of the experiences that shaped African-American life from the period of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the end of Reconstruction. Explores how Africans became African-Americans and how they reclaimed their culture, dignity, and humanity as individuals and as a community. Offered Annually. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity US
  
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    HIST 212 - The Struggle for Equality: African-American History from 1860 to The Present

    4 credits
    An examination of the African-American struggle for equality in American society from the Civil War to the present. Topics include the relationship among gender, race, and class; the relationship between African-American leaders and the masses; African-American culture; urban migrations; the evolution of African-American relationships with local, state, and federal government; and contemporary issues. Offered annually. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity US, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    HIST 213 - Conspiracy Theory in American History

    4 credits
    This intermediate-level elective explores the many conspiracy theories that have permeated American culture from the revolutionary era to the present day. Specific theories to be covered include: the Illuminati scare of the 1790s, the Anti-Masonic theories of the mid-1800s, the presidential assassination theories centering on Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, alien abduction theories, HIV/AIDS infection theories, and post-World War II theories concerned with an all-encompassing New World Order. Students will consider these theories in the context of the social, intellectual, political, and cultural forces that accompany them. Students will also learn to analyze critically the validity of different theories by evaluating the evidence and logic used by theorists to build their cases. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 214 - Monsters, Gangsters, and the Great Depression

    4 credits
    Using classic gangster and monster films from the 1930s as the primary course content, this three-week course aims to increase students’ understanding of a.) the historical realities that influenced the construction of the modern gangster narrative and the modern monster film, b.) the place of the gangster and monster film in the history of film, including the issues of censorship and promulgation of the movie production code, and c.) the gangster and monster films as specific genres, their relationship to other genres of the period including film noire, and the depictions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, urbanism, morality, etc. that defined these genres. Lastly, students will consider how and why these two genres remain influential in the present. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity US
  
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    HIST 215 - History by the Numbers

    4 credits
    This mid-level course explores various historical topics using the U.S. Census, Statistical Abstracts, opinion polls, online historical archives, and selected European sources. Topics include politics, public opinion, immigration, lifestyle, ethnicity and race, gender and sexuality, economic growth, income inequality, technology and manufacturing, and natural resource utilization. This course seeks to develop students’ competency in analyzing quantitative information, and in relating this information to real-world conditions. Students will learn how to read statistical tables, import data to spreadsheet programs, generate graphs, and perform basic analyses using spreadsheet functions. Advanced students will be encouraged to undertake more sophisticated analyses such as word frequency counts and arguments using logical operators. A laptop computer with an installed spreadsheet program required. No mathematics background needed.
    CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Quantitative
  
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    HIST 216 - The History of Rock and Roll

    4 credits
    This course will survey the origin and development of rock and roll music in the United States.  Beginning around the early 20th century, it will explore the cultural, social, political history, manifest in early popular music, from Joe Hill’s songs on behalf of the labor struggles of Gilded Age America, and “Leadbelly’s” twelve-string virtuosity and song writing cataloging the struggles of African Americans in the Jim Crow south, to Woody Guthrie’s twangy rendering of the Depression era “dust bowl” and “Pretty Boy Floyd.” Indeed, American popular music is both born of and embodied within the complicated fabric of American social, political, and cultural life.  From these origins, the course will trace the advent of early rock and roll following World War II.  Rock and Roll combined the various popular musical traditions and forms, most famously with the rise to stardom of Elvis Presley, to offer something both new and old for a rapidly expanding and changing audience.  In the decades that followed, Rock and Roll expanded dramatically in form and influence to cut across lines of race, class, and gender (blues, folk, R&B, punk, etc.) to both fascinate and bedevil critics, political leaders, and mothers and fathers everywhere.  The course will examine these developments and the various ways Rock and Roll continued to be both a reflection of and affected by late 20th century U.S. history. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 217 - U.S. Food Cultures

    4 credits
    Food means different things to different people, at different times, because all food knowledge is cultural and must be learned.  How is that knowledge generated and maintained?  How and why does it change over time?  What is the relationship between food and identity, at a personal and group level?  How can food both foster solidarity and divisiveness?  How is food political?  In addressing these and other questions, we will explore the multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings we attach to food in American culture.  We will explore the symbolic value and meanings of food, with attention to identity categories, such as gender, ethnicity, class, religion, etc.,,m as wekk as meanings at the sites of production, preparation, marketing and consumption.  As an interdisciplinary course, we will explore different approaches to the study of foodways, such as cultureproduction and transmission, relationships to the environment and issues of social justice, and aspects of AMerican history, such as slavery, industrialiation, immigration and globalization.  The class is discussion based, includes outside “food experiences” and gives students Breadth Interdisciplinary, Diversity U.S. and Writing Intensive credit. CLA-Breadth/Interdisciplinary, CLA-Diversity US, CLA-Writing Intensive
  
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    HIST 230 - History of Ancient Greece

    4 credits
    An introduction to the history of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, including its artistic, social, economic, religious, military, and political developments, and the evolution of the basic concepts that have influenced Western thought. Special attention is given to original sources, with readings from the Greek historians and consideration of archaeology. Same as: CLAS 230 . Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    HIST 232 - History of Ancient Rome

    4 credits


    An introduction to Roman history, covering the rise of Rome, Roman imperialism, social stresses, the transition from Republic to Empire, imperial civilization, the rise of Christianity, and the decline of the Roman Empire. Offering varies.

      Same as: CLAS 232 . CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International

  
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    HIST 236 - Medieval Europe

    4 credits
    A study of the development of European civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Emphasizes political development from the Germanic monarchies to the emergence of dynastic states, feudalism, Christian philosophy, and the development of the church, including economic, social, and cultural trends. Alternate Years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 238 - Crusade and Jihad Then and Now

    4 credits
    This course investigates and compares the relgious origins of the ideas of crusade and jihad. In both cases a devotional practice became militarized; we will discuss how these practices became militarized both theologically and practically. We consider the contested spaces of the Mediterranean, including Jerusalem, that fostered the delvelopment of these forms of religious warfare. We will then examine how these ideas became transformed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in movements and events as varied as romanticism, the Red Cross, colonialism, World War I, Pan-Arabism, and Wahhabism. All of these reimagined, idealized, and represented the medieval world (Latin or Arabic) so as to promote radically different agendas. Same as: REL 238 . Offered Fall semester in even-numbered years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities, CLA-Diversity International
  
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    HIST 241 - Jewish History from Roman Times to the Enlightenment

    4 credits
    An overview of the remarkable history of the Jewish people in post-biblical times, beginning with the Roman occupation of Palestine and concluding with the impact of the Enlightenment on Jewish identity. Among the topics to be studied are the Roman exile of the Jews, the religious traditions and national hopes that accompanied them in the diaspora, the emergence of European and Oriental Jewries, the martyrdom of Jews during the Crusades, the Jewish Golden Age in medieval Spain, the Spanish Inquisition, the European Jewish enlightenment. Same as: JWST 241 . Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
  
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    HIST 242 - Thrones, Theatres, and Witches: Early English History

    4 credits
    A survey of English history from the Roman invasion to Queen Anne. Traces the development of feudalism, the monarchy, parliament, religious conflict, and the pre-industrial economy. Describes the historical background to early English literature. Offered spring semester in alternate years. CLA-Breadth/Humanities
 

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